Hmong Christian Collegiate Conference

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Growing Up

Conference theme and speaker information

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What’s your story?

Our stories—the good and the bad—matter.

What was it like for you to grow up Hmong American? At HC3, we will wrestle with our collective coming of age stories and how it is a part of shaping our identity and faith. How might our perspectives change as we revisit the beautiful and broken pieces of growing up? What purpose are our stories for?

 

Kathy Khang

HC3 2019 SPEAKER

Kathy Khang is a writer, speaker, and coffee drinker based in the north suburbs of Chicago. She has been on staff with InterVarsity for more than 20 years and is currently serving as the director of campus access.

Kathy is the author of Raise Your Voice: Why We Stay Silent and How to Speak Up (IVP, 2018), encouraging women and men to examine the idea of “voice” and influence within Christianity and why using that voice and influence is important. She is also one of the authors of More Than Serving Tea (IVP, 2006) – a one-of-a-kind book exploring faith, gender, culture, and ethnic identity from the distinct perspective of Asian American Christian women.

During her two decades with IVCF Kathy oversaw multiethnic training and ministry development for staff and students in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin as well as spending 10 of those years as the campus staff for the Asian American InterVarsity chapter and then as the area director overseeing undergraduate ministry to more than 300 students at Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.

An alumna of Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, Kathy worked as a newspaper reporter in Green Bay and Milwaukee, WI before going on staff with InterVarsity.

Kathy is also a columnist for Sojourners magazine and spoken at countless conferences across the country as well as guest lecturing and speaking at North Park Theological Seminary, Moody Bible Institute, Wheaton College, Q: Women & Calling, National Youth Workers Conference and the Wild Goose Festival. She blogs at www.kathykhang.com, tweets and Instagrams as @mskathykhang, posts at www.facebook.com/kathykhangauthor, and partners with other bloggers, pastors, and Christian leaders to highlight and move the conversation forward on issues of race, ethnicity, and gender within the Church.

When she’s not staring at a computer screen she can be found enjoying life with her husband and three children, reading, doing her nails, practicing yoga, or searching for the perfect pen and journal.